Home > Norman Neasom Exhibition > Neasom. N (Watercolours) > 56 Wootton Wawen Church of St. Peter

56 Wootton Wawen Church of St. Peter by Paintings by Norman Neasom (1915 - 2010)

56 Wootton Wawen Church of St. Peter by Paintings by Norman Neasom (1915 - 2010)

Wootton Wawen Church of St. Peter

Watercolour - Signed and dated

Image: 365mm x 510mm

St. Peter’s Church, Wotton Wawen is the oldest church in Warwickshire and one of the oldest structures in Middle England dating back to the early 8th century. Its tower dates back to the 10th century. The original church was built of wood and later replaced with stone, part of the original stonework can still be seen today

St. Peter’s Church, Wotton Wawen is the oldest church in Warwickshire and one of the oldest structures in Middle England dating back to the early 8th century. Its tower dates back to the 10th century. The original church was built of wood and later replaced with stone, part of the original stonework can still be seen today

The parish church of Saint Peter is notable for having the most pronounced Anglo- Saxon work in the county. It is the oldest church in Warwickshire, although much of the present fabric is later. It comprises a chancel with a south chapel, nave, South aisle and on the North the tower embattled and pinnacled. There are also North and South porches the east jamb of the south porch has several voltive crosses scored into it

The base of the tower and the first two stages are Saxon with four doorways, the top of the tower is 15th century as are the clerestory, the nave battlements, the north doorway and porch, the middle arch of the arcade, the west window with busts of a king and queen and the east window with a leaf frieze. The tower is the earliest part of the church, preserved in the middle despite restricting views of the chancel from the nave here, is the current site of the altar. The font is an octagonal bowl resting on eight sculptured heads similar to others in the county at Snitterfield and Lapworth. The old oak pulpit and choir screen is 15th century.

The church has a small chained library of 17th-century theological works and some notable monumental brasses  particularly the altar tomb of John Harewell and his wife Anna (1505).

An interesting painting, although unfinished. Norman was very interested in the church at Wootton Wawen, not just for the architecture but the history as it is one of the few churches in the country that has the cross of returning crusaders. In the 12th Century, knights that were going to fight in the Crusades would leave their mark on one side of the church doorway and when they returned they would make their mark on the opposite side. Many knights did not return as they were either killed or dies from disease so to see the mark on both sides of the door was very rare

Enquire - send an email to us